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AMEA awards 3 scholarships

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The LaFayette City Council recognized the city’s three AMEA scholarship winners at Monday night’s meeting. The scholarships are each in the amount of $2,500 and are awarded to senior’s whose families receive electric services from AMEA’s member cities. LaFayette’s three recipients are all seniors at LaFayette High School. They are Travion Smith, Jadalyn Story and Kelsey Trammell. Pictured at the meeting are the scholarship recipients along with the LaFayette council; from left, are Councilman Terry Mangram, Councilwoman Tammie Williams, Smith, Trammell, Story, Mayor Barry Moody, Councilman Mike Ellis and Councilman Stevie Rowe.
The LaFayette City Council recognized the city’s three AMEA scholarship winners at Monday night’s meeting. The scholarships are each in the amount of $2,500 and are awarded to senior’s whose families receive electric services from AMEA’s member cities. LaFayette’s three recipients are all seniors at LaFayette High School. They are Travion Smith, Jadalyn Story and Kelsey Trammell. Pictured at the meeting are the scholarship recipients along with the LaFayette council; from left, are Councilman Terry Mangram, Councilwoman Tammie Williams, Smith, Trammell, Story, Mayor Barry Moody, Councilman Mike Ellis and Councilman Stevie Rowe.

The LaFayette City Council recognized three outstanding high school students at their regular meeting on Monday night at City Hall. The AMEA’s annual scholarship recipients, along with members of their families, were on hand at the meeting to accept their award from the mayor and council.

Each year, AMEA and its 11 member cities make available 33, $2,500 scholarships, which include regular and technical school scholarships. To be eligible for either of AMEA’s scholarships, a student’s family must receive electric service from a member’s electric utility, in this case the City of LaFayette, and the student must attend an Alabama college or university. This year scholarships, totaling approximately $82,500, have been awarded through the program.

LaFayette’s three recipients are all seniors at LaFayette High School. Travion Smith is the son of Dennis Satterwhite and Titanya Longshore. He plans on attending Alabama State University where he will study Biology with an emphasis in Pre-Med. Jadalyn Story is the daughter of Patrick and Cynthia Story. She is the LHS Valedictorian and plans on attending Auburn University where she will study Biology. Kelsey Trammell is the daughter of Cecilia Trammell. Kelsey plans on attending Southern Union State Community College in Wadley where she will study Cosmetology.

As has been the case over the past few meetings, the council discussed several grant opportunities. Of note, action was taken for the city’s ATRIP (Alabama Transportation Rehabilitation and Improvement Program) application. The council approved Resolution No. 2013-05-13-01, which authorized the submission of the ATRIP application, that the city will provide the matching share and the mayor is authorized to sign any necessary document pertaining to the grant. The ATRIP application is for resurfacing and drainage and sidewalk improvements on Alabama Ave. from the city limits to LaFayette High School. The total cost, which includes preliminary design, is $1,091,832. The city is required to fund a 20 percent match, which would equal $316,738. Greg Thompson from Alabama Municipal and Environmental Engineers was on hand to speak about the application and said the new road would meet federal standards. The resolution was approved unanimously.

Thompson also talked to the council about possible Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) available. He said that after speaking with department heads, it’s clear that dirty water is an issue that needs to be addressed. “We can use CDBG to find ways to clean up water,” he said. “Its not anything someone’s doing wrong, it’s old pipes.”

He laid out several scenarios around the city where water services can be improved, either by replacing pipes or looping certain sections. He said that major problem areas would be addressed first in a “phase one period” of applications with the understanding that much more needs to be done in subsequent applications. Thompson highlighted work on Hospital Street, Highway 50, B Street, Alabama Avenue as well as numerous fire hydrants. He noted that in getting work done on Alabama Ave., it would be best to improve the pipes before new paving was done. “We need plans for today, but also for the future,” he said. CDBG grants had a deadline of June 10, but that has been extended; the city is required to provide a 10 percent match with these grants.

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